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#1 09-14-2015 20:48:46

clg18
Lurker
Registered: 08-17-2015
Posts: 4

new cylinder head

Just took apart my 2000xj. Not sure who to go with for a new cylinder head. I deffinatly don't want a remanufactured head. And I don't want to spend a lot of money. Any ideas.

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09-14-2015 20:48:46

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Re: new cylinder head

#2 09-14-2015 20:57:31

thomas
Helper
Registered: 10-22-2008
Posts: 15

Re: new cylinder head

If you do get another 0331 head use 05 and up . No cracking issue's.

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#3 09-14-2015 21:00:49

yaboo
Helper
Registered: 10-05-2008
Posts: 24

Re: new cylinder head

I've had very good luck having cracked heads welded, all kinds from 4 cyl Volvos (Aluminum) through 2000 HP diesel mine truck engines. I suggest you get an estimate from a cylinder head repair shop.

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#4 09-14-2015 21:02:41

chuck
Rookie
Registered: 10-22-2008
Posts: 66

Re: new cylinder head

I think you can get a god deal on the reman cylinder head. Or you can get a junkyard head from any 4.0 2001 and later (0331). The early ones (the first year or so) had cracking issues. The later castings were better.

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09-14-2015 21:02:41

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Re: new cylinder head

#5 09-14-2015 21:10:53

jock
Helper
Registered: 10-05-2008
Posts: 30

Re: new cylinder head

The 00' 0331 cracking head issue is due to the material being too thin between cylinders 3 & 4. The cracking can just occur without overheating or with overheating. But, it was known by Chrysler and that is why the 01+ 0331 heads are what you want to get.

The best for this solution would be to find a 06' 4.0 head from a wrangler. But, that isn't that easy. But, it is said that all the replacement heads are using the new molds, so that thin area on the factory 00' 0331 heads is no longer an issue.

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#6 09-14-2015 21:15:33

evad
Enthusiast
Registered: 10-05-2008
Posts: 239

Re: new cylinder head

Since my '89 and '2000 were both casualties of a local shop performing a system flush without properly re-filling (and my wife driving it, and not calling me until AFTER the fact), I have TWO heads that have been planed down, one has been welded, and both still leak.

Depending on where the crack is, welding it may be an option, but from the crack locations I've seen in the later heads, a weld repair to the visible crack simply makes the remaining crack (the one between runner and jacket that you can't see) into your worst nightmare. If the cylinder head was say... three times larger, a deeper repair would make sense, both in access AND in cost, but I haven't been able to justify doing that again. Industrial and antique engines have the 'unobtainium' content with which to be concerned, but these are very plentiful, so picking the replacement option is the sensible first.

As far as valve guides, seals, etc... I wouldn't worry about that. Finding and boiling out a good used casting and magnafluxing it is the first step. Making the purchase, and paying for the cleaning/inspection is the risk, but the whole purpose of taking that risk, is to minimize losses in the event that the casting is bad... saves you the cost of doing all the other work and reassembly, and perhaps additional future damage. If it passes, having it skimmed to assure flatness, and getting proper finish for gasket, and the rest is garage-duty.

Knocking out valve guides is ridiculously easy... drive them out with a drift. Putting new ones in, is exactly the same, with exception that you need to make a tool that will engage and drive the new guide in, without damaging the guide. I use an old valve... and while big shops frequently have a special tool that establishes alignment, the guide rarely needs it, provided you 1) start it carefully and 2) drive it sensibly. I've pushed new valve guides into 4.0 heads... as well as 250 Chev's, SBCs, flathead Fords... even a Hercules JXLD and a Fairbanks-Morse ZC-118... never ruined a guide in ANY of 'em.

Drop in the valves, and take a lapstick to each one... won't take much, just enough to establish a clean pattern around the lip, so you know they all went in right. New valves are inexpensive, so if any look problematic (spalled, burned, or bent) just replace them. You can test springs on a flat workbench, just press against them, and note any that 'feel' weak. If you think you've got one that's sacked-out, take 'em to a shop, they'll pop 'em in the spring tester ( basically a bathroom scale with a lever to compress and take a reading) to verify. toss the bad ones in the junk box, and install new ones. It's not difficult (actually, rebuilding a head is kinda fun) and doesn't take long. If you've got a football-TV in the garage, it'll take you 2 games' worth of commercials.


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